Wireless baby onesie will help parents sleep better too

Parents are ready to buy anything from video monitor or movement-sensing pad to make sure their little one is sound sleeping through the night. Rest Devices a Boston startup understood very well that need and have found a better way to monitor sleeping infants. They developped a wearable baby onesie embedded with with built-in sensors that can report on baby’s vital signs (breathing, temperature, and movement) over Wi-Fi to parents’ smartphones, tablets, or other connected devices. ”New parents want to know how their baby is doing at all times,” says CEO Thomas Lipoma. “This can tell you if your baby is on her stomach or her back, if her temperature spikes, if she’s moving around, and if she’s breathing normally.” That last factor, of course, is a major fear for parents, who worry about sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDs.

 

Lipoma, on the right, with Dulcie Madden, Rest’s head of business development

Sensors that can report on baby’s vital signs over Wi-Fi

The garment technologie hides in stretchy green bands on the onesie. Captors will collect information about the infant’s respiration as her chest rises and falls. Temperature and movement sensors will be built into a turtle-shaped transmitter — which right now is produced by a 3-D printer at Rest’s Leather District headquarters — and an audio monitor will be built into the base station. The whole system will be able to send alerts to a mobile phone, or log data from night to night on a website, allowing parents to look for trends. “We like to call it ‘quantified baby,’” says Madden, referring to the “quantified self” data-gathering movement.

onesie.jpg

The product should hit the market later this year

Aiming for a price somewhere between $100 and $200, the onesies’ package would include three onesies, a small turtle-shaped transmitter that clips onto the front with magnets, and a plug-in base station that would send data from the nursery over a home’s WiFi network. (Another option is that the transmitter could communicate directly with a Bluetooth phone.)

 

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